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The janissary

Discussion in 'vBench (Works in Progress)' started by Roc, Oct 21, 2004.

  1. Roc Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Hello marc, thanks and hope you are right.

    About the patterns, I'm thinking about it and I will take it into consideration.

    Keep up the good work

    Cheers

    Roc :)
  2. Roc Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    This is the formula for the Orange, forgot to post it with the pictures.

    Orange

    Base= cadmium orange + some Cadmium red light.

    Medium shadows = base plus more + more Cadmium red.

    deep shadows = Cadmium red.

    extreme shadows = Cadmium red medium.

    First highlight = Cadmium orange + Cadmium yellow.

    second highlight = Cadmium yellow

    extreme highlights = cadmium yellow + a little titanium white.


    Cheeers

    Roc :)
  3. Joe Hudson Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Hey Roc,

    This one is shaping up to be a really nice addition to your collection.

    Joe
  4. Roc Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Hey Joe,thanks buddy,I appreciate it.

    Keep up the good work

    Cheers

    Roc. :)
  5. Roc Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    The holy book of Islam. Also referred to in English as "Quran", or "Qur'an". The latter is the correct transcription, but in this article we use the commonly used "Koran".
    The exact meaning of the word 'Koran' is not clear for us today, but the three main theories connect it to either the word for 'collect' or to the word for 'tie together', or perhaps best to the most commonly used word for 'read' or 'recite', which is an important verb in the book itself.
    The Koran as a book is the result of:

    1. Revelations given to Muhammad in the period 610- 632 (Muhammad's death).

    2. Writing down of these revelations by people around Muhammad in a period probably starting some years after 610, and ending a couple of years after 632.

    3. Compilation of these writings stretching from mid-630s and perhaps until mid -650s.

    4. Vowelling and dotting of the text. Ancient Arabic was written without dots, leaving some letters look identical. And in many cases the lack of vowels would make two different words look identical.
    It was therefore up to the memories of the learned to remember what was the correct meaning of every word. But as these learned people died, the early Muslim community found it important to save the exact meaning once and for all, before it was too late.
    Essential to the reading of the Koran are the interpretations of the content. There are still some scholars working on interpreting the text, but this was a more common act during the first centuries of Islam.
    As the Koran has a structure and a language, as well as allusions, which often are difficult for the normal Muslim to understand, a whole science were built around the comprehension of the Koran. The early Muslims studied history, language and nature science in an effort of understanding the Koran better. The product is surprisingly well accepted by the whole Muslim society, and no Muslim child or adult of today, studying the Koran, does this without help from the interpretations built on the early sciences of the Koran.
    The early efforts of Koranic science have given room for different approaches to the book and its content, but apart from the interpretations of the , all interpretations are looked upon as parallel, meaning that one of them cannot be put ahead of the other.
    There are today 7 ways of reading the Koran, each of these have two variances, leaving the Muslims with 14 ways of reading the Koran. But in modern Koranic science this applies only to Muslim scholars, the ordinary Muslim reads the Koran without entering this level of complexity.
    The Koran is divided into 114 suras, which are opened by indications on their origin. The origin is either Mecca or Medina. But it is generally accepted that some of suras have parts from the other city than the one indicated as the origin. The whole structure of the Koran is a science in itself, as there is no chronology in it, like the one found in the Bible, and as the most of it consists of commandments and warnings, and only a small part are stories.
    The following can be said about its structure: Except the first sura, 'al-fâtiha, 'The Commencement', the longest suras are found in the beginning, and then gradually decreases on to the end of the Koran. Sura 2. 'al-baqara, 'The Cow' is 286 âya (verses) long, while sura 114 is only 6 aya long. But the shortest are sura 103, 106 and 108, all consisting of 3 aya.
    USE OF THE KORAN

    The two main importances of the Koran for the believer are: 1. Being the focal point of all Muslims. The Koran is regarded by most as the uncreated word of God, written on golden tablets in Paradise. This view, strongly contended inside the Muslim world in the first centuries, became orthodox towards the end of the most fruitful period of Muslim science (it is however clear that this is misunderstanding, see below).
    Until the middle of the 9th century (2nd hijra century) the dominating view among theologians was that the Koran was created by God, hence it is his spoken words. For the Muslims today, the Koran is a physical proof of Islam.
    2. Being the sound of Islam. When recited, a holy atmosphere is created, an atmosphere involving God, the world, the truth and peace. During the moment of reciting, the compound becomes sacred, and the moment powerful.
    The reciting of the Koran is an art known by most Muslims. The most frequently used technique normally involves sitting on the ground with the book in the lap or placed on a specially made low table. This sitting position is resembling the lotus position used in eastern religions, but is not at all strict on the upright position of the spine — most Muslims bend over the Koran they read.
    The reading technique uses a rhythm with around 60 beats a second. The performance of this rhythm, is done with both torso, swaying a little in a oval shape, and voice and reading speed. Surprisingly overlooked by most Western scholars, the reading of the Koran is a meditative moment for all Muslims, and a ritual that can be performed anywhere anytime.
    The Koran's actual guidance in everyday life for Muslims, must not be overestimated, despite the common misconception that the Koran gives guidance on all aspects of life is strong among many. As a matter of fact most moral and legal questions a Muslim will ask him/herself is not answered by the Koran. This is well illustrated by the use of many other sources for the development of Sharia.
    And in general, most Muslims will think of the Koran as far too complex to be a guide in daily matters if it should be interpreted by a Muslim layman.
    When a Muslim has problems understanding the real truth of the Koran, he/she will resort to books written by men learned in Islamic sciences or ask the learned in the local society. There are situations where Muslims look up the Koran for guidance, but this will be in cases where they know what to look for, and where to look.

    TRANSLATIONS OF THE KORAN

    Muslims not speaking Arabic will normally stick to an Arabic version of the Koran. Most of them will learn how to read Arabic text, and learn some Arabic words, and then read the Koran according to the way described above. In general, Muslims will agree that the Koran can never be correctly translated, and that the Arabic original is the only version that is correct.
    Translations of the Koran are in many cases a fruit of the needs of western scholars and others in the West interested in Islam.
    The first translation of the Koran into another language was to Latin in 1143, and this was performed by a monk, in the need of understanding the Crusaders' enemy.
    From the 18th century and up until now, the Koran has been translated into most western languages, and with a steadily increasing quality. Today most Muslims endorse this effort, with the hope that some misunderstandings on Islam can be refuted, and also that Islam can reach more people in the West.

    WORD OF GOD OR MAN?

    There is a common idea today that all of the content of the Koran is eternal and there is a theological idea that the original of the Koran is written on golden tablets in heaven, as said in sura 85:22. The "Koran" referred to here cannot be the entire volume of today's Koran, but the core content. Virtually all Muslims believe it to refer to the entire existing Koran, but this notion must be deemed a misunderstanding.
    The Koran must be understood as an amalgamation of 2 forms of content: The actual message from God that Muhammad wanted to pass on. The other element are stories or passages relating to Muhammad's prophetic activity, as well as God's advice directly on Muhammad's prophetic activity. Below follows examples of ayas relating directly to incidents from Muhammad's own life:

    Attached Files:

  6. megroot A Fixture

    Country:
    Netherlands
    Roc,

    Maybe you have this to teach at schools. I say it before, i learn more from history and other culture's since i started to paint figures than in my whole study's.. :(

    Thank you.

    Marc
  7. gforceman Well-Known Member

    Country:
    Belgium
    Hi Roc,

    How about publishing a book on the Janissary? I have Kethuda Bey from Athens miniatures laying around for months. You have just inspired me to continue working on it. Thanks mate.

    Greetz,

    Gino
  8. Roc Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Hello Marc, I'm happy to hear that you are finding my research interesting.

    I also have learned more history from painting figures than I did in College.
    Every time I see a painted figure that catches my fancy,it makes me want to find out more about the subject's historical time period.

    happy painting and keep those paint brushes wet.

    Ciao

    Roc. :)
  9. Roc Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Hi Gino,thanks for the encouragement,I appreciate it.

    I have seen the Kethuda Bey from Athens miniatures and I totally agree with you, it is a very beautiful sculpture.

    I'm looking forward to seeing y your version,I'm sure you will do a fantastic job. ;)
    Will you be doing a step by step?

    Happy painting and keep those brushes wet.

    Ciao

    Roc :)
  10. yeo_64 Active Member

    Country:
    Singapore
    Hey Roc,that's an EXCELLENT piece of research that you got going there,informative and to the point. WELL DONE,my friend (y) (y) !! Looking forward to the next installment/step in the series. Cheers !
    Kenneth :)
  11. Roc Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Kenneth , my friend, how are you? It's always great hearing from you.

    What will you be sculpting next? Looking forward to your next sculpture. ;)

    Keep up the good work.

    Ciao

    Roc :)
  12. Guy A Fixture

    Country:
    United-States
    He is looking good Roc. Have you thought to how you will do the base and groundwork yet?.......Thanks for the historic background too. Makes the thread alot more interesting (y)
  13. Roc Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Guy, my friend, I'm not sure yet, what do you think? Do you have any suggestions? ;)

    Keep up the good work.

    Cheers

    Roc :)
  14. Guy A Fixture

    Country:
    United-States
    Hey Roc,

    He could be done in several ways since his one foot is up higher than the other. He could be coming down steps of an old ruins with weeds and grass comming up between the broken pieces of stone, formally a walkway or highway, Using an old pillar either upright or laying on the ground with vines of ivy growing over part of the pilar. Or he could be advancing down a hill and use a base with the top surface cut at a 45 degree angle. So many possibilities with thei figure. I haven't decided yet with mine......heck.....I can't even get him to the spray booth to prime him.
  15. Roc Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Thanks for the suggestions Guy, I appreciate it. I will take them in consideration.

    I did some more work on the Janissary and took some pictures; I will try to post the picks tonight, time permitting.

    Keep up the good work and I hope you start painting that Janissary real soon. ;)

    Cheers

    Roc. :)
  16. Roc Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Hey Guys I just finished painting the lining off the Caftan and the sash.
    When completely dry I will give them extreme highlights and shadows using the glazing technique.

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    Cheers

    Roc :)
  17. Ernest A Fixture

    Country:
    Venezuela
    Great painting Roc (y) I like the transitions in the jacket and I like a lot the colors of the belt, I guess that the correct name is "sash"...
    Good figure, I can't wait to see the next step...
  18. rafaelega Active Member

    Country:
    Spain
    Roc, my friend.

    I love the red trousers. I agree with Ernest about the belt.

    Well done! ;-)

    Rafa
  19. Roc Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Ernesto,thank you for the compliment,it is appreciated.
    I hope you're friend will let you have the camera untill the end of your step by step.



    Keep up the good work.

    Ciao

    Roc. :)
  20. Roc Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Rafael, my friend, thank for the compliment and the encouragement, truly appreciated.

    Keep up the good work.

    Ciao

    Roc. :)

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