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The Fort Pitt Museum Part 1

Discussion in 'Friends of planetFigure' started by garyjd, Aug 24, 2019.

  1. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    [IMG]
    A map of Point State Park by architect Charles M. Stotz and Associates who includes the distinguished landscape architect, Ralph E. Griswold. The museum building was designed by Stotz, as were the exhibits in the museum.


    I went to the Fort Pitt Museum in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for the first time in the late 1970s. A convention for the union my father belonged too at the time was happening in downtown Pittsburgh close to Point State Park. While taking a walk in the park my father happened upon the museum which was closed that particular day. Knowing my interests in all things military, dad thought it would make for a nice day trip to see the museum. Point State Park was not only the location of Fort Pitt but the location of Fort Duquesne, the French fort that was the last of a chain of forts that ran from Fort Duquesne (Pittsburgh) to Fort Presque Isle located on the shores of Lake Erie, in what is now present day Erie, Pennsylvania. The museum was built into what would have been called the Monongahela Bastion. Another of the fort's other bastions was restored and incorporated into the park complete with a walkway. Visitors entering the museum would view an impressive model of Fort Pitt upon entering the museum. As a young boy that was fascinated with dioramas, models, and historical artifacts, the displays sent this kid into sensory overload. The museum galleries told the story of the history of both forts and their respective roles in the French and Indian war and later periods. Most of the display cases had a diorama and or model to accompany artifacts along with descriptive text. I was most intrigued with the figures that ranged in size from around 1/76 scale to 1/6 scale, in addition to uniformed life size mannequins. Without a doubt this museum was a major influence in my interest in historical miniatures and sculpting. With the approach that museums take in regards to displays today you might be hard pressed to find a museum with displays of this nature anywhere. I would visit the museum a few more times in my youth and would not see it again until grown up with a family of my own. That visit would see an surprisingly different museum from what I remembered from my youth.


    The video shows what the Fort Pitt museum looks like today. The resolution unfortunately is not that great.
    https://www.wqed.org/tv/watch/onq/fort-pitt-museum?page=1

    Continue reading...

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