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SCULPTING 101 STEP BY STEP

Discussion in 'Sculpting' started by garyjd, Feb 24, 2006.

  1. Dan Morton A Fixture

    Country:
    United-States
    Ray & Gary - I don't use the "thin putty" process for everything. On the last two or three figures I built up the body until it was more or less proportional, but somewhat skinny, then clothed it with very thin layers of putty. I use a roller I bought from Dick Blick. Makes very even and thin layers easy. Even when I leave the end of a shirt cuff open at the wrist, the cavity is shallow. Most of the shirt or trouser is solid. It's just an 'effect' that I like.

    Gary - What I really like about your approach is the apparent analysis you go thru to design the elements of the figure. You appear to always know exactly what you are trying to achieve and how to pull it off. By comparison, I'm pretty much clueless and, as my Brit friends say, "just having a bash".

    Ray - How long does it take me to complete one 120mm figure? Hmmm. I have to try to estimate it in terms of how many 'weekends' were devoted to it. I'd say I use 70% of my typical weekend in sculpting in some way or other - say 6 - 8 hours a day. For the 'toot' figure - and that was a simple one - 11 weekends - a total of 66 to 88 hours so far and I have at least part of another weekend yet to do - sanding, smoothing, clean-up. But I still like 120mm!!

    All the best,
    Dan
  2. Ray Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Dan,
    Wow, 66-88 hours per figure, I doubt I spend more than 6-10 on any figure of no greater complexity (civilian for instance) than your 'Toot' model. Of course, I could easily double or triple this number by adding the hours spent meditating on the subject model and procrastinating while staring at the thing. :) Military figures, well too much depends on what equipment items are on hand and which have to be made, (put into molds too, so I don't have to do it all over again). This large scale stuff take real commitment, eh? For the time being, just have too much to do, I'll have to give the large scale figures a miss, but good for you and Gary in making them. ;)

    Do you guys use an armature like the one I use in my posing SBS, or just built the body up from blobs? Also, what’s 120mm scale to anyway, 1/15th or something close?

    Ray
  3. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Ray, I guess you would have to look when I first started posting the sbs. In all liklihood the figure would either be further along or done if I did not stop so often to take pictures.~Gary
  4. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Dan, Though I try to carefully plan most aspects of the figure out, I normally miss something along the way or have to go back and make a correction.~Gary
  5. quang Active Member

    Country:
    Belgium
    Gary – What amazes me is your ability to stick to your initial vision!
    If it was me, before long, the figure would have stepped down from its pedestal and come back under a totally different guise and pose! Like a samurai or an Indian. :lol:

    Ray – If you consider that a 120 mm figure would measure 1.80 m in real life, then the scale is 1/15. That's the way I see it.
    The armature on my figures (120 and 90 mm) is made from all-purpose zinc wire as found in hardware stores.

    Dan – Like you, I use rolled sheet putty to clothe my figures. It works well but be prepared to do a lot of carving afterwards to 'spice up' the folds.

    Thanks again, Gary, for this instructive serial.

    (y) (y)

    Quang
  6. Ray Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Gary,
    I haven't seen the start of this figure yet, I'll locate it and have a look later, thanks. :)

    Quang,
    No cast body parts, just wire! I'd hate to have to bulk out a body every time, especially when the body is to be so large. I thought it was 1/15th, but it was easier to ask so late at night than to get out the calculator and do the math. :)

    Ray
  7. quang Active Member

    Country:
    Belgium
    Ray,

    Er... as a matter of fact, the non-flexible masses of the body (head, torso, pelvis) are resin castings. The flexible parts (limbs, spinal column, neck) are made from wire.

    Here's how the mannekin looks like at the start of a project.

    Upper arms, thighs, feet and neck are already wrapped with putty to 'freeze' the pose.

    [IMG]

    HTH

    Quang :)
  8. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Quang, thanks. :) ~Gary


    If you need a tool to help scale a figure or equipment to the scaler here on planet figure. It works great for weapons too.~Gary
  9. Ray Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Quang,
    That's more to my liking, and none too different from what I'm used to. Nice pose too by the way, what scale, (assuming 120mm) and what's he going to be, (looks like a nice ranger/rifleman, or perhaps and Indian scout to me)?

    Gary,
    Still I'd have to go there and look, and with the brain on the energy saving setting I couldn't be troubled. :lol: Thanks, though, I'll look now.

    For the rest sorry about all the seemingly pointless questions/comments, this is the first real opportunity I've had for conversing about figure making/sculpting with other like minded persons since I started doing the stuff myself so long ago. There just aren't many train guys who know anything about figure making, or who really care for that matter. :(


    Ray
  10. quang Active Member

    Country:
    Belgium
    I often start looking for an interesting pose BEFORE knowing what I'll do with it.

    I agree that this one screams 'frontierman, native, ...'. We'll see how it turns out. ;)

    Cheers,
    Q.
  11. marvin Member

    Quang,

    Question: in using resin casts for the non-flexible masses, how do you handle the raising of an arm and the resulting shift of the shoulder?

    The only thing I can think of is that this is a 'skewing' of the torso with a redistribution of muscle mass... Don't know if I made myself clear....

    - Marvin -
  12. quang Active Member

    Country:
    Belgium
    Marvin,

    For the raised arm, I'd cut the shoulder portion off the resin torso. In which case, the arm wire would be made longer to accomodate the missing shoulder.

    Keep in mind that the resin parts are meant to represent the bone structure (thoracic cage, pelvis bone and skull) and NOT the muscular masses. Most anatomical errors originate from this confusion.

    HTH
    Q. :)
  13. Mitchell Ward New Member

    Aluminium foil works great for this purpose, especially on the larger figures. Its uneven surface is perfect for capturing Super Sculpey. Sometimes I don’t even use any wire at all, just foil.

    -Mitch-
  14. Ray Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Quang,
    The log kind of puts one in the right frame of mind for a figure of this type. :)
    Mitch,
    Does the aluminum foil cause any distortion or bubbling when baking? :( Interesting idea, thanks for the input.

    Ray
  15. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    A little more clean up is all that's left for this sleeve. I added a little more putty to the armband which will be cleaned up once cured.

    Attached Files:

  16. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Another view.

    Attached Files:

  17. marvin Member

    Quang,

    Thanks for clearing that up. I've just started on a figure and I was wondering about the correctness of the pose. I'll post something later and maybe you guys could have a look for me.

    Cheers,
    Marvin
  18. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Here the folds of the upper right arm have been roughed in. A little more putty will eventually be added to the collarbone potion of the torso to put more emphasis on the raised right arm.


    Sorry for the dark pictures.

    Attached Files:

  19. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Another view.

    Attached Files:

  20. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    For the lower half of the sleeve I start out with a small rolled out sheet of Aves that will form the cuff. I try to keep the edge as close as possible to a scale thickness. I will then go in later an backfill the inside to give the putty more strength.

    Attached Files:

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