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SCULPTING 101 STEP BY STEP

Discussion in 'Sculpting' started by garyjd, Jan 18, 2006.

  1. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Trousers Confederate trousers were similiar in cut to their Union opponents. Early regulationsestablished light blue as the color for trousers and existing garments show their use to some extent throughout the war. Trousers made of gray and brown as seen in jackets were more common in the Southern army. The trousers were often made of the same wool-cotton jean material as jackets.

    Though the pose of my figure does not scompletely match that of the model, is is of great help to get the folds right.

    Attached Files:

  2. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Before begining I went in and filled out the left leg a bit as it looked too thin.

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  3. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    In addition to filling out the left leg and a couple of areas here and there, I also worked in a criss-cross patter with an X-acto to give the Sculpey something to hold onto. Before working in this pattern I first went over the legs with rough sandpaper.

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  4. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Before adding the Sculpey that will become the trousers I smooth Diluent all over the legs with my finger. The first application of Sculpey is over the upper right thigh and groin area. I initially use my finger to spread the Sculpey over the surface of the figure. By looking not only at my reference photo, but period photos as well, paying attention to the areas of the trousers that are loose as well as tight. The areas have a thicker or thinner layer of Sculpey depending on their placement on the legs.

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  5. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Profile view of the right leg showing the rough trouser leg minus folds and other refinements.

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  6. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    The right leg as shown from the front. There are areas where more Sculpey needs to be worked in and others where some needs to be taken away.

    Attached Files:

  7. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    The overall figure as seen from the right. This and the next photo were taken slightly from abover so there is some foreshortening of the figure.

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  8. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Another view of the full figure. I'm not sure if I want to rough in the other leg as well or do the trousers one leg at a time. Any suggestions?

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  9. fsdesimone Member

    The SS is still "wet" at this time, right? I imagine it'd be a lot harder to work a second leg if the first is not solid, no? I mean, I know sculptors do it all the time, but usually they're working on larger scale figures.

    I recently started a figure where I started both legs at the same time and because of the pose that was a mistake - made it very hard to get to the inside of the legs easily. I should have just done one at a time and at least that way I'd have only have had trouble on one leg.

    Francesca
  10. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Francesca, I'm going to go the route of one leg at a time. I've done it before and it works better that way. It's really easy to disturb the work on one leg while working on the other. This way there is no other work to disturb and when you work on the second leg the first has already been baked. I've done it this way before, I just gave the alternative a thought and decided against it.~Gary
  11. Roy New Member

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    Very wise I think Gary...
    I have added an extra detail or section of clothing to a figure numerous times in the past...then checked back to smooth the previously sculpted area, only to find a really sweetly rendered thumb print...just where those delicate folds were not more than a minute ago.. :)

    Really enjoying the thread by the way..!

    All the best...Roy.
  12. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Roy, Thanks I appreciate it. Sometimes it's hard to not do too much work on a figure in one sitting. The more you push it, the greater the chance disaster will strike.~Gary
  13. callum Member

    Hi Gary,

    Excellent work as usual. :lol:

    Regards Callum.
  14. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Callum, Thank you, there is much more to come.~Gary
  15. marvin Member

    Did I miss something? When did this figure grow a beard?!

    Good stuff!

    - Marvin -
  16. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Yeah, I added a bit of a goatee and mustache. The remainder of the hair will be added after doing the arm that will be brushing his forehead.~Gary
  17. Calvin Member

    Gary, in my opinion you might want to consider the possibility to group all your (scattered) posts about that figure in a full, stand alone article. I found your post very useful. So clear and clean tutorials with a true step by step about sculpting are really hard to find.
  18. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Thanks. The sbs will be worked into a single article or several articles detailing the process once the figure is complete.~Gary
    kidsbday7 likes this.
  19. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    I normally will indicate the folds by marking them out with my spatula. Close attention should be paid to onlt only there placement but direction as well.

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  20. Roy New Member

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    I'm watching closely Gary...and learning a lot about the application and methods of super sculpey.

    If you have time to answer this one for me...(and no doubt many others who are following)...I have no problems getting a really smooth surface with Magic Sculpt..which I always use...I've been using Super Sculpey for a while for some experiments, and I find that when I try to smooth the surface, if I'm not extra careful, it kind of 'picks up' very small excess pieces of sculpey..maybe I'm over working the surface a little...it's not a great problem..but what do you think..?..and do you have any problems creating a smooth surface while the sculpey is still soft..?...would any small pieces of residue be better removed after curing perhaps..?..and sanded instead.


    Many thanks...Roy.

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