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Non matalics or matalics

Discussion in 'Painting Techniques' started by malc, Jul 6, 2019.

  1. malc PlanetFigure Supporter

    Country:
    England
    This has probably been done but I thought I'd do it anyway.

    I like NMM even though it can be a pain to do convincingly, so what do others on PF prefer, ???
    Wings5797 likes this.
  2. ivopreda A Fixture

    Country:
    Italy
    did you ever seen them from real?great in picture and often very bad from real
    Wings5797 and malc like this.
  3. malc PlanetFigure Supporter

    Country:
    England
    Interesting.....

    Viewing distance is important I think.

    I like NMM braid but swords not so sure.
    Wings5797 likes this.
  4. Mariobusta Well-Known Member

    Country:
    New_Zealand
    Prefer metallics
    malc likes this.
  5. malc PlanetFigure Supporter

    Country:
    England
    I'm actually trying a combination of both.
    Wings5797 likes this.
  6. Alex Well-Known Member

    Country:
    Canada
    interesting thread
    here are two pictures taken from my WIP I have just posted
    first picture is showing the metals done with metallics (shaded with matte paints)
    while on the second one, the metals were redone in NMM

    why this change ? because my first rendition was missing something, that only NMM can give you in pictures and in real..
    that something is the possibility to go from pure white to pure black with non metallic paints and trick the eye in giving the illusion of a metallic surface, any metallic surface. Also, you decide where the highlights will be and every reflection, so you have more latitude in your rendering. Now I am now saying it is easy (and true metallics are not either) but they are worth trying one day. image.jpeg image.jpeg
    yellowcat and malc like this.
  7. Richard Baxter Well-Known Member

    Country:
    Scotland
    I would always favour metallic. After all, the original was made of metal, so why not paint that? Having said that, I always use ink or oil washes over the original to reduce brightness and give the effect of wear.
    malc likes this.
  8. JasonB A Fixture

    Country:
    United-States
    Metallics
    For me, NMM makes 3 dimensional figures look like flats or a bit like an illustration, instead of a representation of the real thing. I have only seen them in pics, but many comments have stated they don't as good in person.
    malc likes this.
  9. valiant A Fixture

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    I prefer metallics. NMM look fine from one viewpoint, but if the figure is 3D, the shadows, highlights, etc should change as the viewpoint changes. Just my two penn'th(y)
    malc likes this.
  10. fogie Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
  11. malc PlanetFigure Supporter

    Country:
    England
    Yes I saw that link, very involved however it is in my VERY humble opinion worth the effort.....

    You can always go over with some matalics if your not happy.
  12. fogie Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    Hi Malc

    Back in the day (the time of the Pharisees) I mixed appropriate sintered metal powder to oil paint and then burnished with a little graphite
    dust to enhance the specularity - a technique I've continued to use over 50 years. Recently, though, I've been attempting to create non-metallic
    effects. It''s something that works comfortably enough when painting illustrations, but as Valiant says can be difficult on three dimensional
    figures. Still, time will tell. Perseverance... eh ?

    Mike
    malc likes this.
  13. Richard Baxter Well-Known Member

    Country:
    Scotland
    I still have some of the old gold paints from the 70s produced by Rose. You mixed flakes of gold paint into a varnish medium and applied. Anyone else remember these?
    malc likes this.
  14. malc PlanetFigure Supporter

    Country:
    England
    I have silver.
  15. Babelfish A Fixture

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    I've heard the "NMM look crap to the naked eye" argument before, but I don't really buy it.

    I think that as with anything, it's less about the medium and more about the painter. In talented hands both can look spectacular. In less talented hands ... well ... both can look rubbish.

    Personally I tend to favour metallics and find that I achieve better results with them. Probably though that's only because I've not (yet) had very much practice with the relatively new phenomenon that is NMM. But I've seen some amazing examples of NMM effects both in pictures and first-hand on show tables that I'd love to be able to emulate.

    - Steve
    malc and fogie like this.
  16. Richard Baxter Well-Known Member

    Country:
    Scotland
    Agreed.
    malc likes this.
  17. yellowcat Well-Known Member

    Country:
    Canada
    Yes, I still have some.

    rose4.jpg
    malc likes this.
  18. Richard Baxter Well-Known Member

    Country:
    Scotland
    Does anyone actually still use them?
  19. Steve Edwards Member

    Rose Gold Powders

    I used to use these all the time for buttons, badges and sword hilts etc. And still would if you could get them. My last lot were in the flat brown bottles and a little went a very long way. I used to use the Rose paints as well. But that's all gone now...

    I still prefer metal powder for painting metals. They are usually called "Bronze Powders" and you can get them from various art suppliers. I like to use Roberson Bronze Powders which I buy from Cornelissen in London. You'll need a medium for the powder to make paint. I don't know what the Rose medium was but I always guessed that it was Japan Gold Size, which has been used in gold leaf work for years. Japan Gold Size is slow drying, which is supposed to be a good thing for metallic paint as it allows the metal particles to rise to the surface as the paint dries.

    Well indeed, don't ask me. All I know is that it makes a bright metallic finish which dries overnight and stays bright.

    Nowadays, I use Winsor and Newton Japan Gold Size. Dip your brush into the size then dip it into the powder. Slosh the brush around on your palette to mix into a metallic paint. Lovely stuff.
    Nap likes this.
  20. yellowcat Well-Known Member

    Country:
    Canada
    Video for using bronze powders:

    Jaybo, Nap and malc like this.

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