1. Copying kits is a crime that hurts original artists & producers. Help support your favorite artists by buying their original works. PlanetFigure will not tolerate any activities related to recasting, and will report recasters to authorities. Thank you for your support!

Non glossy oil painting

Discussion in 'Oils' started by yellowcat, Feb 8, 2020.

  1. yellowcat A Fixture

    Country:
    Canada
    I never have the glossy sheen problem or need any matte varnish on my oil painted figures. Seldom soak out any extra oil when mixing paint. I even add my own medium to the paint which is one part stand oil and 5 parts turp/od thinner.

    A small fan brush is used for my non glossy painting. Fan brush is used by landscape and portrait artist to blend oil colour on canvas.

    Here is the procedure to paint my figures without using any matte medium since the early eighties.
    After laying down the oil paint on the figure your usual way, use the fan brush very lightly and gently go over the painted area in an up and down and diagonal brushing motion to pick up the excessive paint.
    Transfer the excessive paint on the brush onto a piece of paper or on your palette. Go over the area once more so that it only leaves a very thin layer of paint on the surface.
    Because of the up and down and diagonal brushing, this will break up and diffuse the light reflection on the surface eliminating the slick smooth glossy surface of oil. It should dry up to a complete natural velvet egg shell finish without any brush mark showing at all.

    brush3.jpg


    Here are some tests that I did using different medium mixed with oil painted on paper palette. Liquin, Grumbacher oil painting medium 1, Dorland Wax, OD thinner and straight from the tube using the fan brush technique. All came out no shine non glossy.

    IMG_0002.JPG

    IMG_0003.JPG

    IMG_0004.JPG

    Happy painting!

    Felix
    samson, Chrisr, Jaybo and 5 others like this.
  2. Henkm Active Member

    Thanks for showing this. I follow the 'apply small amount of paint then use flat brush to spread it around' approach as Milan Dufek shows in his videos. I find likewise that the paint dries non-glossy
  3. Nap A Fixture

    Country:
    England
    Hi Felix

    Thanks for sharing your knowledge on Oils ...everyone can learn from this a great reference

    Interesting for me as an acrylic user to see this

    Nap
  4. kagemusha A Fixture

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    Hi Felix...not unlike my own technique with oils and...like you...I never soak out the oil prior to applying...nor do I ever add any kind of medium.
    Personally...I prefer to use 'makeup' brushes to remove the excess paint after the initial application...although it is purely a case of 'whatever works for you'.

    Always useful to see oils promoted.

    Ron
    akaryu and yellowcat like this.
  5. yellowcat A Fixture

    Country:
    Canada
    Hi Ron, I haven't tried to use makeup brush. I always preceive the makeup brush hair is too thick and that's why I make my own fan brush. The fan brush long thin hair really take care of the brush mark. May be I will try makeup brush one day.

    Felix
    kagemusha likes this.
  6. fogie A Fixture

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    Terrific stuff as usual, Felix, which will clearly be more than useful. The kind of posts you offer do so much to help
    painters actually understand the medium - something vital for those who wish to become a better artist.

    On a personal note, I've always used the 'dry brushing' technique for soft blending and smoothing the paint surface.
    Fan Brushes were traditionally used for portraiture and, back in the day, I used them regularly (they were especially
    handy for softening horizons to simulate misty landscapes). Although I have a miniature version of one, which is
    brilliant for sorting all the highlights and shadows on horses, it's still too big for actual figures. Instead I use a worn
    out old No 3.

    Once again, Felix, great post !

    Mike
    Jaybo likes this.
  7. kagemusha A Fixture

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    There are many sizes of makeup brushes Felix...they are the softest brush available...and don't shed hairs...with the smallest sizes being ideal for blending as well as thinning back the primary coat of paint.
  8. Chrisr PlanetFigure Supporter

    Country:
    Australia
    Many thanks for sharing this Felix.

    Cheers
    Chris
    yellowcat likes this.

Share This Page

planetFigure Links

Reviews & Open Box
Buy. Sell & trade
Articles
Link Directory
Events
Advertising

Popular Sections

Figure & Minis News
vBench - Works in Progress
Painting Talk
Sculpting Talk
Digital Sculpting Talk
The Lounge
Report Piracy

Who we are

planetFigure is a community built around miniature painters, sculptors and collectors, We are here to exchange support, Information & Resources.

© planetFigure 2003 - 2019.