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Kusma Krjutschkow, 4th Don Cossack Regiment, 1914

Discussion in 'vBench (Works in Progress)' started by Martin Rohmann, Jul 8, 2017.

  1. Borek A Fixture

    Country:
    Czech-Republic
    Interesting and again very thorough documentation of your work (many interesting detailed photographs of horses for me ;) ). Great project, I'm curious to continue :).

    Cheers Borek
  2. Martin Rohmann A Fixture

    Country:
    Germany
    10. Day, November 14, 2017


    Today I started with the bridle ...:

    Cossacks had to put their horse and their equipment for the military service and at their own expense at that time (they paid no taxes!) - clear that there were the most different variants and preferences to see!

    Many horses were equipped with a very simple bridle, which was braided from a single long leather strap ...:

    [IMG]


    Any Cossack could do that - and in the shortest possible time, get a new bridle from a reins or even a rope.

    On the next two pictures we see such simple snatches ...:

    [IMG]

    [IMG]


    Richer Cossacks could, however, afford to equip their horses with brass-pierced bridles ...:

    [IMG]


    Most Cossacks, however, preferred normal Trenses, with browbstrap, throat belt, double jaw straps and noseband.


    Unlike traditional bridles, where the back of the noseband was strapped to the chin strap ...

    [IMG]



    ... the Cossacks preferred a variant in which this belt was strapped much higher ...:
    [IMG]
    The advantage:

    The horse was able to graze at any break - even when it was tussled - without his rider having to open the chin strap first.

    And with approaching danger the Cossack could immediately sit up again and act without having to fix the bridle.

    Here are three pictures that show this typical Cossack bridgehead ...:
    [IMG]
    [IMG]
    [IMG]
    Earlier I painted the first page of the Trense - although I have been working with oil paints again for a long time - with these ones ...:
    [IMG]
    The only ornament I have given the bridle on forehead and noseband thin red piping - which I have painted with these colors ...:
    [IMG]
    Incidentally, this close coexistence of oil and acrylic paints partially compensates for the long drying times of the oil paints!

    Had I also painted the red piping with oil paints, it would probably have become the most "beautiful" mess!

    This is how my Cossack Trense looks like now ...:
    [IMG]
    [IMG]
    [IMG]
    The other side I pick up for tomorrow - and after that the metal parts of the bridle are made!


    As for the metal parts, I have one more question / request for you:

    I have the choice between "silver" and "brass" when painting the metal parts - both is possible ...:
    [IMG]
    What do you mean? What should I take...?
    Cheers
    Blind Pew, anstontyke, Borek and 2 others like this.
  3. Nap Forum Moderator

    Country:
    England
    Martin

    Great references on the bridles , and the horse is really good , love the colour it is .....

    ....as for the buckles perhaps our Cossack has ones inherited and prized from his father ...I like the idea of a golden version , think it will depend how it looks all together , gold buckles would contrast with the lance point .

    Perhaps a little more highlighting on the red piping ?

    As always it's going to be a great result

    Thanks for sharing

    Nap
    anstontyke and Martin Rohmann like this.
  4. Martin Rohmann A Fixture

    Country:
    Germany
    11. Day, November 15, 2017

    Today the other side of the bridle - with a bit more lights on the red pipings /especially for you Nap, thanks!)...:

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]


    Cheers
  5. Nap Forum Moderator

    Country:
    England
    Hi Martin

    So much life in the painting ....love the style of painting as well as such a comprehensive SBS/References

    Nice highs on the red !

    Following right behind you

    Nap
    anstontyke and Martin Rohmann like this.
  6. Martin Rohmann A Fixture

    Country:
    Germany
    12. Das, November 16, 2017

    Today I painted the metal parts at the bridle.

    I did it with this colors...:

    [IMG]

    First a thin coat of "Steel" from "Dark Star", then gazett carefully a few light reflections with silver, which I tinted a bit with black.

    It should not shine too offensively.

    At the beginning of the war in 1914, our vision is still playing during the deployment and advance marches of the Russian army to East Prussia.

    And Cossacks were (as scouts) not only eyes and ears of the army, but also (as dispatch riders) whose mouths and guards for staffs and bodyguards for higher commanders.

    Rhey hardly came out of the saddle for days and after three days in wind, weather, dust and horse sweat not much shines on such a bridle ...

    The steel color of "Dark Star" recommended by a friend in Eindhoven - I bought it there. I am pleasantly surprised by the vial, because even a mixing ball is standard in it.

    Something like that of "Vallejo" not - although the "Dark Star" things are comparable in price.

    That's how it became ...:

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]


    Cheers
  7. Dan Morton A Fixture

    Country:
    United-States
    Martin - The texture paste really works well to roughen the horse skin! What a great idea! Just a novice painter's opinion, but, no kiddin', this is the best painted horse I've ever seen. (y)
    All the best,
    Dan
    anstontyke and napoleonpeart like this.
  8. Martin Rohmann A Fixture

    Country:
    Germany
  9. Martin Rohmann A Fixture

    Country:
    Germany
    13. Day, November 17, 2017


    At the front of the Cossack's saddle, the rolled up greatcoat was unbuckled ...:

    [IMG]

    [IMG]


    This was not only practical, but also had a protective function: In combat so the sensitive abdomen of the Cossack was better protected against weapons effect of unrivaled opponents - for example, bayonet stitches of infantrymen!

    [IMG]


    These greatcoats had the typical indefinable gray-brown-green Color, wihich was so common in military clothing in Russia!

    [IMG]


    That had something to do with the Russian supply system! The state did not supply its regiments with ready-made uniforms, but cloth bales, buttons, etc., from which the regimental tailors made uniforms and coats on site.

    But far more often - due to the long transport routes - the quartermaster of each regiment bought them locally with state funds - and between one army supplier in Novocherkassk on the Don and another in - say - Warsaw, the fabric colors could vary considerably!

    These calf-length greatcoats - called "Shinel" - had a button row since 1909 ...:

    [IMG]

    [IMG]


    In reality, these were double-breasted coats, whose "free" end was closed on the right under the shoulder piece with another - concealed - button ...:

    [IMG]


    On the back was an adjustable "latch" that prevented the leather belt that was being worn on the coat from sliding down ...:

    [IMG]


    The coat lapels had no buttons so that they unbuttoned did not hang down on both sides of the horse. Rather, the rider sat in the saddle on the coat tails ...:

    [IMG]


    The quality of these soldier coats was - lousy!

    No trace of a lining, and you can formally senn the rough wool fabric, as it must have scratched on the skin!

    [IMG]


    Don Cossacks wore red collar patches on the coat - simple soldiers without a decorative button! - and shoulder peaces ("Pogony"), with the blue-red peace colors being worn far more frequently than the actual prescribed war pieces!

    [IMG]


    Officer's greatcoats were of course much better quality!

    An officer in the coat was immediately recognized because his "Shinel" had two rows of buttons ...

    [IMG]

    ... and on each collar patch an additional decorative button was worn ...:

    [IMG]


    The outrageous quality difference between officer and soldier greatcoats can be seen very well even on old black and white photos - as on the next, which was made in 1909 and shows members of the Guards Cavalry ...:

    [IMG]


    The coarse woolen fabric of a simple Cossack coat is also clearly visible on the next picture from 1916 ...

    [IMG]


    ... is screaming for the modeling with "Jo Sonja's" Texture Paste, in which I'm a little bit fond of at the moment anyway.

    As modeling tools I am currently hovering with small homemade "rubber stamps" and a toothbrush.

    Next week I'll go there!

    Who has a smart modeling idea: Please tell me!


    Have a nice Weekend

    Cheers
    anstontyke, Borek and napoleonpeart like this.
  10. Martin Rohmann A Fixture

    Country:
    Germany
    14. Day, November 20, 2017

    Today the smooth sculpted coat roll of my Cossack should become "rough wool"!

    So, my modeling day begins with careful taping of the horse's finished painted sections and the four leather straps that are strapped to the front of the saddle ...:

    [IMG]

    [IMG]


    Then I made small "stamps" out of a pair of tweezers and scraps of coarse-pored foam (as it usually accompanies the figure packs):

    [IMG]

    [IMG]


    Important:
    One should make a pair of these "stamps" in stock, since the foam pores clog up quickly when working!


    Next I applied the texture paste of Joe Sonja with a small spatula - section by section! - and worked with my "stamps" the surface so long, until - in my opinion - a convincing structure was to see how coarse wool fabric it has.

    You have to be careful not to smudge the already modeled folds of the jacket roll, because they will be needed later!

    After about an hour of careful "stamping" I had the fabric structure like I wanted it ...:

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]


    Now may the texture paste - of which I am in turn excited! - cure at rest.

    Morning is primed...


    Cheers
    Blind Pew, anstontyke, Borek and 4 others like this.
  11. Huw63 PlanetFigure Supporter

    Country:
    Switzerland
    This an excellent SBS Martin - thank you. I really appreciate the history behind the bust too.

    Cheers

    Huw
    anstontyke and napoleonpeart like this.
  12. Nap Forum Moderator

    Country:
    England
    Martin

    Great use of that paste ...I got a bit worried seeing white on the mane but it was tge reflections against the cling film wrap ..phew!

    Happy painting

    Nap
    anstontyke likes this.
  13. Martin Rohmann A Fixture

    Country:
    Germany
    Huw and Nap...:



    ----------------------------------------------------------

    15. Day, November 21, 2017

    I have just finished painting the greatcoat muffler on the saddle!

    Previously, I thought hard about which color scheme to choose - we saw that from light gray to dark green, pretty much everything happened and is possible.

    Finally, I chose this color ...:

    [IMG]


    A light gray would probably have become more beautiful - but it's not about beauty!

    I chose this ultimately indefinable coat color because it is almost typical for Russian soldier coats! It's is not green, not brown and not gray - it's is a bit of everything ...:

    [IMG]

    The color I have mixed together from these components ...:

    [IMG]

    To paint the shadows, I increased the amount of "Cocolate Brown", to make the lights increased components of "Light Flesh" were used.

    And this is what the coat looks like now - I think I met the original color pretty much ...:

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]


    Tomorrow we continue with the harness ...

    Cheers
  14. Martin Rohmann A Fixture

    Country:
    Germany
    16. Day, November 22, 2017


    Today the leather straps, the greatcoat roll is strapped with to the saddle.

    Colors again - lether with oils...

    [IMG]


    ...metal buckles with Arcryls...:

    [IMG]


    This is it...:

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]


    Well, ONE Detail is still missing at my horse - I will build it by myself.

    But tomorrow...


    Cheers
  15. Martin Rohmann A Fixture

    Country:
    Germany
    17. Day, November 23, 2017


    If you look closely at pictures of Cossacks from before and during the First World War, you will notice that there is another strap on the bridle besides the two reins, which are fastened to the bridle rings ...:

    [IMG]


    Sometimes "forks" this belt and is attached to both bridle rings, but mostly it depends only on one, namely the left ...:

    [IMG]

    [IMG]


    To the left was dismounted from the horse and from the left also climbed up - from the other side was not possible for the saber hanging on the left side of the rider .

    In the next photo we see that the belt ran from the bridle ring to the saddle and was fastened there ...:

    [IMG]


    By the way, this is nothing new, there are - carefully researched! - Cossack drawing from the mid-19th century, on which this belt is also visible ...:

    [IMG]


    On the next picture the function becomes clear:

    It is a so-called Holding Strap, with which they could hold the horse (or tie), when it's rider had dismounted ...:

    [IMG]


    With this belt, the horses were also tied together "in column" by the respective horse keeper, when the riders were in Action without horses.

    And finally:

    You did not need to take the reins off your neck when you stopped, and in case of sudden danger, you could immediately sit up again and fight (or lose weight!) without having to fumble with the reins.

    I have made such a strap today!

    The strap itself, the tab (with indented holes) and the eyelet for the tab are made of thick Armomaschutz foil, which is on my "Gauloises" cans, the width (3 mm) corresponds to the jaw straps of the bridle.

    Buckle and thorn I make from 0.5 mm solder ...:

    [IMG]


    After glueing together the items, the strap is attached to the horse ...:

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]


    Cheers
  16. Borek A Fixture

    Country:
    Czech-Republic
    Great progress Martin. I very much appreciate your diligence in providing backgrounds even when working alone. Great joy for me to watch your threads :).

    Cheers Borek
    anstontyke likes this.
  17. Martin Rohmann A Fixture

    Country:
    Germany
  18. Martin Rohmann A Fixture

    Country:
    Germany
    18. Day, November 24, 2017


    I have just finished the painting of the hlding strap!

    Originally I planned to paint the "leather" again with oil paints, but had to make a compromise and take Arcylics...:

    [IMG]


    The reason:
    The belt hangs free in the room and is glued only at the bridle and the saddle. And I was afraid that he bends when blending the oil shades, for there is indeed a certain pressure exerted.

    My painting technique for acrylic paints - thin "layers" of shades and blends with even thinner glazes - is better for this belt!

    When photographing, I had to bite into another "acid apple":

    Outside it is so dim and gray that I had to use the "hard" light of the daylight lamp! Only then are lights and shadows on the only 3 mm wide "belt" to recognize ...:

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]


    Unfortunately, this light kills quite a few reds and makes the colors - even of the horses fur - seem somehow paler and more yellowish. Can I do nothing, today ...

    Next week we will continue!

    Have a nice weekend!


    Cheers
  19. Martin Rohmann A Fixture

    Country:
    Germany
    19. Day, November 27, 2017


    Today, I intended to start painting the head.

    Just take off the protective painters tape from the wooden base and put the finished horse in the closet - I thought to myself.

    And experienced a nasty surprise!

    With the tape, a large part of the wood "veneer" said goodbye to the beautiful base!

    [IMG]


    Below, softwood came to light, as you can see.

    The pedestal is not veneered in hardwood or hardwood itself, but is pressure-impregnated with something that looks deceptively real like "veneer".

    And this stuff apparently had no really solid connection with the ground and broke off with the tape!

    [IMG]


    Almost everything was down at the upper - thin - part of the base, less at the lower end.
    I did not even need to sand off the adhesive residues, the stuff was so loose that it could be scraped off with the knife blade! How to clean a carrot ...
    What now?
    There was now a pretty nice painted horse bust in front of me (I think) on a ruined pedestal.
    Cut off the bust and get a new base? Hmmm.
    I let the thing stand on the desk for the first time, did nothing - and went to the kitchen next door, to do the dishes.


    When washing dishes, I had an idea:
    How about simply painting the "veneer" on the softwood ...?
    And then it occurred to me that I had done something similar, albeit voluntarily, six years ago!
    Since I had glued a self-cast base plate made of modeling plaster on a wooden base ...

    [IMG]


    ... and the "veneer" then painted with acrylics.

    The result had looked pretty good at the time - by the way, I still think today ...:

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    So I set about painting different veneers of brown and red (and very little black) on the ruined pedestal.

    It turned out to be a bit simpler than it was then, because there was no noticeable grain that needed to be painted.

    The only important thing was to imitate the effect with color, that each surface becomes brighter for itself to the outside.

    The hardest thing was actually to find out the right color mixtures!

    I painted every surface for itself and modeled the iridescent shades by painting very thinly, with lots of water and pretty fast, so that I could blend the acrylics "wet in wet" outwards with a hard bristle brush.

    That's what it looked like after an hour and a half ...:

    [IMG]



    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    Then I let the colors dry completely and painnted the pedestial still with ...

    [IMG]

    ... treated two very thin coats, diluting the glaze stuff pretty much with water.

    The more water you add to the "Gloss Varnish", the matte it gets.

    Now that it has dried, the restored pedestal looks like this:

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    "Operation succesful!" I would say...

    [IMG]

    But what do YOU think...?


    Cheers
  20. Huw63 PlanetFigure Supporter

    Country:
    Switzerland
    If you knew what i thought you’d be worried Martin but I think that you’ve rescued the bases very successfully and it looks very good.

    Cheers

    Huw


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    anstontyke likes this.

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