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Jungle Jim

Discussion in 'vBench (Works in Progress)' started by DaveCox, Mar 5, 2006.

  1. DaveCox Member

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    I got hold of a cheap Dragon 1/16 figure, and not having any place for the SS in my collection decided that he should be modified. With the addition of some spare parts, a Verlinden head and some milliput this is the result. Painted entirely in acrylics. My verdict - could be better, acrylics are not my best media, and my fingers are too stumpy to sculpt well!!

    Attached Files:

  2. DaveCox Member

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    Another pic

    Attached Files:

  3. DaveCox Member

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    And another

    Attached Files:

  4. Dan Morton A Fixture

    Country:
    United-States
    Dave - Quite a nice effort, altho I have no idea why he's "Jungle Jim". Whatever? I particularly like the rifle woodwork and the shirt/jacket.

    Three suggestions - feel free to ignore some or all.

    1 - The fingers look out of scale both in width and length. Take one of the scale anatomical charts that are on Gary's Sculpting 101 and check them. The problem with getting them the right size may be the putty you used. I only worked with Milliput briefly but was not impressed. Magicsculpt or MS+Duro would be easier. Some people use Duro by itself, but I don't. Too sticky. Actually I rarely use it in combination with MS either. The best online price I can find on MS is from Michael Roberts. If you've never used MS, I think you'll enjoy it. I have some Aves Apoxie Sculpt, but haven't tried it yet. Others seem to rave about it.

    2 - The gaiters look bumpy and rough. I don't know if you can do this with Milliput or not, but I use cheap paintbrushes to smooth MS [not Duro]. A brush dipped in very little oil or [even less] hand lotion will smooth the surfaces nicely. Unless the putty is nearly set it will dry without brush marks.

    3 - Did you use a flash for your photos? If yes, it's too strong and producing glare and may be making the colors look wrong. I prefer sunshine if I can get it, but if I'm forced to take photos indoors, I use two desklamps more or less aimed at a light tan painted wall behind the figure. Reflected light is more subdued. You have to avoid creating shadows doing this. Can be tricky.

    All the best,
    Dan
  5. DaveCox Member

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    Hi Dan.
    The fingers are Dragon originals - I didn't change them at all. The gaiters are cut down from the original trousers and then finished with milliput and photoetched straps, I see your point and will try that next time I use milliput. The photos are taken under my modelling lamps, not flash. I have to use the dining table due to lack of space, so I don't have the option of bouncing the light of off a wall - I tried bouncing it off white card but that wasn't any better.
    I named him Jungle Jim as he was originally going to be on a small base with foliage, I just didn't think he was good enough to put anymore effort into and posted him here to get some feedback on the problems.

    BTW: the rifle is from a Firing Line figure, so is the same as you've used on your pieces.
  6. Dan Morton A Fixture

    Country:
    United-States
    Dave - On the fingers - I must have misread. I thought you sculpted them. Sorry about that. Anyway - they look out of scale in the photos. Too long and too large.

    I know other people seem to combine photo-etched pieces into sculpted stuff and they seem to get good results - personally I can't and consequently, don't. For buckles, straps, etc., I think it gives the best result to sculpt them. Most people seem to use Duro-MS in combination to make them, but most of the time I'm using just MS.

    Don't be afraid to stretch yourself with the sculpting. As Jon Smith told me (and Steve Warrilow and others!!!) it's the only way to learn. It's one of those skills that seem to happen more at the motor level and you can only learn it by doing it more and more. Every time I try a piece, I agonize about whether it will turn out OK. Not all of them have, but so far I haven't thrown any against the nearest wall. Usually you learn something - even from the mistakes. As Miles Davis is often quoted, "There are no mistakes.". Lot of truth to that.

    The other half or more of the sculpting - for me at least - is observing people, faces, expressions, clothing and folds, drapery. It's marvelously instructive to watch someone walk and watch the different folds you see develop in their clothing. Or even look at some of the period photos of WWI and look for stuff like that. You'll find it! Great fun.

    All the best,
    Dan
  7. DaveCox Member

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    Thanks again for your helpfull posts Dan.
    I will try sculpting again - just have to get some confidence I guess. Small parts like buckles and that I just can't seem to get to grips with.
    I agree that observation is important. I find myself looking at peoples faces to see where the highlights and shadows are on different shape cheekbones, and at clothing as different materials catch the light in differing ways.

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