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Flesh in Oils / drying between base, highlights, shadows

Discussion in 'Just starting...' started by Showlen, Jun 5, 2011.

  1. Showlen Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Hello (again)- Thank you to everyone that responded to my earlier thread as to brand/grade/color of oils. I have since placed an order so that I can begin painting flesh in oils.

    Once I paint the base in oils, can I directly proceed with the highlights/shadows etc? Or, do I need to allow the standard drying time? I'm wondering if, like on a 54mm figure, I can paint the flesh base, highlights & shadows in one setting - so to speak (no drying time in between). I would think this would be okay in order to blend more smoothly. If the base should be dry, I may try that initial step in acrylics.

    I have a rather small (appetizer-type) crock-pot that I can use- for my resin and metal figures. I'm thinking of constructing a simple drying box using cardboard, foil as liner and a low-watt bulb. I've been searching for some type of plans that show what the appropriate distance should be from the figure to the bulb.

    As always, many thanks for all the help!

    -Ronnie W
  2. redhorse Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    I always paint my flesh in one sitting as it is easier to blend. I'll come back after it's dried and do a little touch up, but that's not always necessary.
  3. DaveT New Member

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    Hi Ronnie,

    You can paint shadows/highlights onto a wet base without too much difficulty - the only issue I found was that if your base coat is too thick, then any subsequent highlight/shadow layers should be of the same or thicker consistency - otherwise the paint seems to slip around. In practice I've found it easier to paint the highlights/shadows over a dry oil base coat - blending works fine as you can feather the edge of each layer. I generally start by laying in a base coat in acrylics, and when dried I follow up with another base coat in thin oils, which gives some depth and overcomes any problems caused by the transparency of oil paint.
  4. giro Member

    Country:
    Spain
    I try to explain my method.

    I first aplicate a base coat(In my case with acrylics). The base color that is as close as the final color.

    I mix with oils 3 levels shadows, one base, and 3 levels highlight, the number os levels depent in each case, more time you can mix color when you need.

    I start with darker shadows i paint it with special attention to no put many paint and extend this. I puc next shadows to this, and some base. Using a clean, dry brush I blend it, in some case I use a round brush, and in some case a flat brush.

    You do same with highlighs.

    After if I need put more shadows and highlight. One think really good from oils is that you can put a dot of paint, and easy blend it.

    After drying oils, you can put more shadows and highlight, and blend it.

    Sorry for my english, not is my language.

    David.
  5. Showlen Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Thank you very much for the suggestions! Looking forward to trying my hand at oils.

    -Ronnie W.
  6. Tecumsea PlanetFigure Supporter

    Country:
    England
    HI Ronnie,

    Before I had a drying box made for me, I used a cardboard box with an anglepoise lamp and glass dome. Put the figure under the glass dome and the anglepoise above it about 1" above the glass. It really heats up inside and does the job of flattening out the oils.
    Keith
  7. Showlen Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Keith, thank you for the tip! I have the perfect glass dome from an old clock that will work perfect, until I'm able to build a drying box.

    Is the cardboard box still necessary with the lamp and glass dome? After setting the figure in the dome, and setting the lamp, did you just place the box over it?

    Thanks again!

    Ronnie
  8. Tecumsea PlanetFigure Supporter

    Country:
    England
    Hi Ronnie,

    I put the figure in the box, the dome over the top of it, and then the anglepoise with the bulb about an inch (25mm in new money) above the glass.
    Have fun,
    Keith
  9. Hank New Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Tecumsea....can u post a few pictures of the drying box and how it was made...and what was made with it please...I am gonna make one myself but I would like to see one before actually making one...also, how long do you keep the figure in the box to dry ??? Thanks !!
  10. megroot A Fixture

    Country:
    Netherlands
    Ronnie,
    I paint base, shadow and highlight in one session. Then overnight into my homemade drybox. Then i go again with the shading and highlight.

    Marc
  11. yellowcat A Fixture

    Country:
    Canada
  12. Tecumsea PlanetFigure Supporter

    Country:
    England
    Hi Hank,

    I think Felix has obviated the need for more pictures, my box is very similar made with ply wood and lined with silver foil to reflect the heat. I use a 40w bulb and have bought a supply to keep me going. If you need more pictures let me know..............Keith
  13. Hank New Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Thanks for the help...that box is awsome...!!
  14. Showlen Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Wow, that looks like a Cadillac of a box! Unfortunately, I'm not that handy when it comes to creating/building things.

    So far I've been using this glass dome from an old clock, a lamp with a 90 watt bulb and it's drying just fine for me. Although, I do want to try and find some good plans to build a drying box.

    Thank you for the help!

    Ronnie W.
  15. Hank New Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Sholwlen...can u take a pic of your drying box setup and post so i can see it..??I might just stick with something simple for the moment...
  16. Showlen Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Hank- I hope this picture helps. As previously stated, I'm using a 90 watt bulb (probably too much) and I'm using the dome to keep dust away, and I think it also holds the heat. This is working well for me so far, so this is what I'm just going to stick with. Let me know if you have any questions.

    Thanks,

    Ronnie W.

    Attached Files:

  17. Tecumsea PlanetFigure Supporter

    Country:
    England
    Hank, I used this method before I bought the light box-It worked very well for me, produced heat and kept the dust away from the figure while it was drying.

    Keith
  18. Hank New Member

    Country:
    United-States
    WoW....thats intresting...Thanks guys!!
  19. pipetrepid Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    ronnie, "wet on wet" works fine on the face. be careful to not over blend. you can alwys go back and touch-up.
  20. Showlen Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    I have finally begun using oils! And, with great help from Paul Blaber, have also started using enamels. I have to say that I feel I have found right mediums that work for me. Though I am still experimenting with what works and what doesn't. Wet on Wet is by far the easiest for me, and being careful to not over blend is still something I'm working with. But I have seen/experienced the effect of over blending. I'm still using acrylics for undercoats and things like leather.

    Thank you again for all of the help and tips!

    Ronnie

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