1. Copying kits is a crime that hurts original artists & producers. Help support your favorite artists by buying their original works. PlanetFigure will not tolerate any activities related to recasting, and will report recasters to authorities. Thank you for your support!

FIGURE SCULPTING 101

Discussion in 'Sculpting' started by garyjd, May 20, 2005.

  1. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Guys, Thanks for for your input. It is participation like this that makes such a thread a "group" project. It's great to see it going this way.~Gary
  2. zyclyon Active Member

    Country:
    Singapore
    Hi Gary,
    I've been plagued by the same problem on the thickness. My resources don't seem to have anything on them.
    Thanks Quang on answering the question on the waist, I too am learning new stuff everyday :)

    Calvin
  3. y_wong New Member

    Dear Gary,

    Thanks for sharing. There is so much to learn from this thread and the exchanges among the modelers add to the knowledge.

    regards :)
  4. slaj Well-Known Member

    Country:
    Malta
    I must be a real idiot to have missed this thread. Now that I got it I won't let go !!


    Stephen Mallia
  5. Dan Morton A Fixture

    Country:
    United-States
    What a super idea, Gary! Thanks in advance! ;)

    all the best,
    Dan
  6. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Guys, Thanks for the responses. Sorry this thread is so slow going on my part. I want to give some time for exchanges between sections.~Gary
  7. gdcdreamer New Member

    Very useful post indeed!
    Some of those master rules are completely new for me!
    This is my little contribution to "the cause". Hope it helps (sorry for some spanish comments on pics)
    Squared comments specify page printing size, to have certain proportions on every scale.

    [IMG]
    [IMG]
    [IMG]

    Cheers
    GUille
  8. Dan Morton A Fixture

    Country:
    United-States
    Hey, Gary! Just a suggestion, but maybe you don't want to go too much further without describing some sculpting tools. Someone who's as skilled and experienced as you, probably has lots of 'em. Particularly interested in tools with specialized uses, your 'tricks of the trade' stuff.

    I can't really use the typical super-glue prepared toothpicks on 120mm sculpting. Maybe they would work on 54mm, 75mm, I don't know. I bought a set of steel sculpting and pottery tools similar to dental tools from the local Dick Blick art store and that's what I'm using. That and the ubiquitous and over-priced X-Acto knives. A single small pane of plate glass with bevelled edges works great for rolling out flat pieces of putty. A little talcum powder on the glass and nothing sticks. Also, I'm using the ends of old paint brushes, some large sewing needles, and about two dozen other odds and ends. For example, the steel end of a 0.5mm mechanical pencil works great for making 120mm scale button impressions. My small contribution...

    all the best,
    Dan
  9. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Tools There are several different tools available to the sculptor. I have a set of dental toools, 2 of which I use for most of my sculpting. I also use an X-acto knife for adding and taking away material. Files of varying shapes also work well in creating folds and creases in clothing. If you are sculpting smaller scale figures toothpicks work well for working in folds and other effects. What tools you use are the choice of the sculptor as there is no right or wrong choice, it's a matter of what works best for you.

    There are other materials that are not pictured that can be thought of as "supporting" tools if you will. Sandpaper of varying grades can be used to smooth material or aid the sculptor in creating folds. Sanding sticks of the variety found in the nail care section of your local Wal-Mart or similiar store are also great to use in the sculpting and or finishing of the figure. I have recently started using fine steelwool or Scotchbrite pads for finish work. These materials all leave varying finishes to your completed sculpture, so a bit of experimentation may be in order. Another "supporting" tool that has come in handy, especially in aiding in the engineering of commercial masters is vaseline. Applying very fine applications of vaseline helps to create a partition between parts that need to be able to separate from the figure. Another tool, especially for those working in Sculpey is Diluent. This is the liquid medium that is used to refresh old Sculpey or help additional layers of sculpey to adhere to one another.


    NOTE I will go more in depth into the uses of these tools once I begin the sculpting portion of the sbs.

    Attached Files:

  10. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Sculpting materials Like tools there are several different mediums available to sculptors. They can be two part epoxy putties, like A&B Epoxy putty, Aves Apoxie, or Magicsculpt that cure by air drying, or polymer clays like Super Sculpey or Sculpey III that cure by baking in the oven. I've done work in both of these materials all have their own strengths and weaknesses.


    Here is one source for two part putties.

    http://www.michael-robertsltd.com/

    Super Sculpey or Sculpey II is available at Arts and craft stores like Michael's or A.C. Moore.

    The tools and Materials section will continue with those materials used for making armatures and weapons and equipment.


    SECTION COMPLETE

    Attached Files:

  11. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Dan, Thanks. No contribution is small.~Gary
  12. Dan Morton A Fixture

    Country:
    United-States
    I have a question on finish texture. I have a Series 77 90mm Imperial German 1914 soldier sculpted by (in my humble estimate) one of the BEST, Pat Bird. The trousers and tunic have different surface textures. If you look closely they actually look like coarse cloth. It's very,very even all across the whole surfaces, in folds, everywhere. How did Pat do that?

    all the best,
    Dan
  13. Guy A Fixture

    Country:
    United-States
    I watched Pat do this when I visited them and it took hours for Pat to impress a cloth into the wet medium to get an imprint. IMHO....worth the time he spent. When this is drybrushed it will bring that texture right up and visible.
  14. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Though we're talking a different scale, garage kit sculptors often use different textures to simulate cloth, skin etc.~Gary
  15. Dan Morton A Fixture

    Country:
    United-States
    Thanks for the info guys! Guy - How lucky for you to be able to watch a master at work! That's a level of devotion to sculpting that I'm not sure I'm capable of. If it took hours, Mr. Bird must have had to re-wet the sculpting media periodically or maybe mixed with less hardener, right? Which or both or?

    all the best,
    Dan
  16. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    ARMATURE MATERIAL There are several types of materials that can be used in constructing an armature. Brass wire or rod works really well and can normally be found in the model paint/supply or railroad section of your local hobby shop. There are other materials that can be found at arts/craft stores. Lead wire on spools or in packs can be found in the floral or jewelry making section of these stores. Pliers and cutters are used to bend and or cut wire to desired lengths. The wire found at craft stoes is probably the most economical way to go. Though not pictured, paper clips work really well for small scale figures. More in depth usage of these materials will also be discussed during the sculpting portion of the sbs.

    Feel free to contribute suggestions for other materials and tools used for armatures.~Gary





    Section complete

    Attached Files:

  17. LCoote New Member

    Country:
    Australia
    Gary,
    I use 1/16" copper wire for my armatures, for me lead wire is too soft and can be distorted easily with rough handling, and I'm pretty rough, but brass and particularly paper clips are too hard to cut, the copper is soft to work but strong enough to handle. I seperate any pieces when the armature's been completed before the clothing is added and I can cut through the copper with an ordinary xacto razor saw without any problems.
    Just my personal preference, that's all.
  18. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Leigh, Though it's pictured, I failed to mention copper. It is probably the best of the materials where flexability is concerned. I do agree the lead is too soft, I flatten it to use as rifle slings and narrow belts and straps. I do want to experiment using it for doing fingers adding small amounts of putty to it or coating it with superglue for strength. I'm going to shop around for more copper as it's nice to have a variety of materials on hand.~Gary
  19. quang Active Member

    Country:
    Belgium
    I use galvanized zinc wire (1,3mm diam.). It's the general purpose wire used for making fences, clothlines,...

    I like my armatures to be rather stiff so that I could make precise bends with pliers. At the same time, the material is soft enough to be cut with regular wire cutters or a jewellers' saw blade.

    As a matter of fact, I was looking for some copper wire to make my first armature and instead found some zinc wire laying around the backyard. I never looked back since! :lol:

    A simple case of adapting the techniques to the material. ;)

    HTH
    Q.

Share This Page

planetFigure Links

Reviews & Open Box
Buy. Sell & trade
Articles
Link Directory
Events
Advertising

Popular Sections

Figure & Minis News
vBench - Works in Progress
Painting Talk
Sculpting Talk
Digital Sculpting Talk
The Lounge
Report Piracy

Who we are

planetFigure is a community built around miniature painters, sculptors and collectors, We are here to exchange support, Information & Resources.

© planetFigure 2003 - 2019.