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FIGURE SCULPTING 101

Discussion in 'Sculpting' started by garyjd, May 20, 2005.

  1. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Figure sculpting 101

    Introduction

    There are several ways to approach the scultping of a figure. With this step by step I hope to at least show one way that it can be done, and hopefully answer some of the questions you may have along the way. This step by step will cover the following areas.

    Proportions

    Tools and materials

    Armature and posing

    The head

    The feet

    Adding the musculature

    The hands

    Clothing and drapery effects

    Headgear

    Equipment

    Finish work



    Each section will consist of text describing the process along with several photos detailing the sculpting of a 120mm figure.

    NOTE: In order to keep each section of the sbs intact please refrain from posting and questions and comments until each section is complete. This will be done by noting the section is complete.

    SECTION COMPLETE
  2. zyclyon Active Member

    Country:
    Singapore
    Hi Gary,

    that's great news! I'm very curious to see your approach.

    cheers,

    Calvin
  3. Dani A. New Member

    Hi Gary,

    Will keep a close watch on this one!

    Dani
  4. Pete Wenman Member

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    Oh boy, I just can't wait

    I need this NOW :lol:

    Pete
  5. Mongo Mel Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Great Gary!
    Really looking forward to this.
    Thanks,
    Craig
  6. megroot A Fixture

    Country:
    Netherlands
    Oke, Gary,

    Now i am looking for the next one. You have my attention.

    marc
  7. Paul Marshall Member

    Gary, can you please include information dealing with 1/35 scale proportions, not just 120mm. thanks.
  8. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Paul, The proportions for a human figure are the same regardless of scale with the exception of the size of the figure. I hope this answers your question.~Gary
  9. quang Active Member

    Country:
    Belgium
    Lights, please! Let the show begin.

    (y) (y) (y)

    [IMG]

    Q.
  10. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Thanks Quang, now the "challange" begins.~Gary
  11. LCoote New Member

    Country:
    Australia
    Gary, it's nice to see you doing another 120mm, looking forward to it ;)
  12. ecsdesign New Member

    really looking forward to it. Im keen to start sculpting in a smaller scale and for me new techniques are always welcome.

    ev
  13. georges64 Member

    Country:
    France
    Great idea this topic,Gary!
    I will follow it with great pleasure !
    Merci M.Gary :)
    g64
  14. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Proportions

    The average figure is seven to seven and a half heads high, with a figure of six to eight heads falling within the normal range. The ideal figure is eight heads high which makes it possible to divide into vertically into eight equal parts from top to bottom.

    chin

    nipples

    navel

    crotch

    mid-thigh

    knee

    calf

    foot


    The following proportion chart was taken from Scratchbuilt, Sculpting, detailing & composing miniature figures, by Andrei Koribanics

    Attached Files:

  15. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    General proportions & measurements of the figure

    1. Front torso Three heads long, from the shoulders to the pubic arch, it divides across the base of the pectorals, across the line of the naval and across the line of the pubic arch.

    2. Back torso Three and a half heads long, across the shoulders to the base of the buttocks, it is divided across the base line of the shoulder blades, across the line of the externus oblique muscles (line of naval in front) and across the line at the base of the spine (line of the pubic arch in front), across the line at the base of the buttocks.

    3. Neck One-half head long in the erect position, from the chin to the pit of the neck.

    4. Arm Two and three-quarter heads long, from the collar bone attachment to the wrist, it divides across the elbow. The wrist lies at the position of the great trochanter, across the pubic arch in front and the coccyx bone in the rear. The hand will add three-quarters of a head length thus making the total length of the arm three and a half heads long.

    5. Leg Four heads long, from the great trochanter to the high inner ankle bone, it divides mid-point at the knee. The foot will add one-fourth head to the length making the total four and a quarter heads long.


    6. Hand Three quarters of a head in length, or the distance from the point of the chin to the hairline, width is one-quarter of a head wide, or the distance from the base of the nose tot he point of the chin.


    7. Foot Foot length is equal to the length of the forearm, or one and a third heads long, width at the front of the foot is one-half head wide.


    The proportions of each part of the figure will be discussed in the sections dealing with sculpting the figure.

    Below is an illustration showing the relation of the foot and the hand to the head. This illustration was taken from Drawing the head and figure By Jack Hamm.



    SECTION COMPLETE

    Attached Files:

  16. zyclyon Active Member

    Country:
    Singapore
    Hi Gary,

    Do you happen to have the measurements of the figure from the side? That is the thickness of the waist, legs etc....?

    Calvin
  17. garyjd Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Calvin, I looked the anatomy book the measurements were taken from and there do not appear to be measurements for the thickness of the various parts of the body. I'm not sure how to answer why only the lengths and width are the only measurements given. That's a great question I'll try to find the answer to. If anyone else has this information readily available please share. Thanks.~Gary
  18. megroot A Fixture

    Country:
    Netherlands
    Gary,
    This is a difficult one. You have explained the proportions very clear. From my own profession (orthopeadic technician) i deal the whole day with broken bones and deformations.
    There is nothing so much different then the width of the human body.
    It depends on how much the person trained, hungry or a every day a good meal etc.
    So i think it is so difficult. Maybe i can give a little direction. The thickness of a arm, leg or something depends on how it is moved. When you bend your arm, the biceps (frontside upperarm) gonna be shorted and the triceps is gonna be longer.
    So when you sculpt that the biceps is much rounder and the triceps is long and small. But how far must you go. Is it a boddybuilder. You go real far.
    Maybe you can say that the thickness of a muscle in contracted condition on normal humans is about twice his length in not contraction.
    That is how you gotta sculpt this.
    I hope i make something clear in my poor english
    Marc
  19. gforceman Well-Known Member

    Country:
    Belgium
    This is so great. i'm printing all that's said here, and in the end I will have a manual on sculpting. I then only need to find a place where I can buy the talent and I can start sculpting.

    Thanks again for this great manual.

    Gino
  20. quang Active Member

    Country:
    Belgium
    Great, useful chart, Gary.

    As for the thickness of the body, just keep in mind this simple rule: THE CHARACTER SHOULD BE ABLE TO SWALLOW HIS OWN HEAD. :eek:

    The rest will follow suit.

    HTH,
    Q.

    Attached Files:

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