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Circassian of His Imperial Majesty's Own Convoy. First half of the XIX century.

Discussion in 'Digis - Digital Miniatures 3D Modeling' started by Vladimir Sychev, Mar 27, 2020.

  1. Vladimir Sychev Well-Known Member

    Country:
    Russian-Federation
    Hi, everybody. And again-the Caucasus.
    This time it was the Circassian Of His Imperial Majesty's Own Convoy. First half of the XIX century.
    The prototype was this engraving:
    events_14112013B_2.jpg
    Enjoy your viewing.

    1.jpg 2.jpg 3.jpg 4.jpg 5.jpg 6.jpg 7.jpg 8.jpg 9.jpg
    Jaybo, vince wai, eddie_C96 and 17 others like this.
  2. Oda A Fixture

    Said it before,will say it again,if it's a Sychev it is a masterpiece.This is no exception.I suppose it is a 3D design and thus it can be printed in various scales,right?Is it for the same collector as the previous sculptures from the same era and country?

    Oda.
    Jaybo, fogie, Ryan_bg and 2 others like this.
  3. NeilW A Fixture

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    A lovely, and to Western eyes at least, a novel figure.

    Difficult to believe that wearing mail extended late into the C19th/early C20th.... but it did:

    C1.JPG C2.JPG C6.JPG C4.JPG

    C7.JPG C8.JPG C10.JPG C5.JPG

    And here's a lovely (if dubious) story from WW1... not sure if the 2nd pic is a set-up?

    C9.JPG C3.JPG
  4. Richard Baxter A Fixture

    Country:
    Scotland
    A beautiful piece. Congratulations. Look forward to price and ordering details.
    Vladimir Sychev likes this.
  5. Sergei Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Difficult to believe that wearing mail extended late into the C19th/early C20th.... but it did:

    - did not they continue wearing chainmail in India then too?
    Vladimir Sychev and NeilW like this.
  6. NeilW A Fixture

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    Yes, they did... and in various other parts such as Afghanistan, Persia (as then was), Tibet, North Africa and so on.

    ... and still Germany today!
    CM.JPG CM1.JPG
    Vladimir Sychev and Sergei like this.
  7. Nap A Fixture

    Country:
    England
    Hi Vladimir

    A very interesting and unusual figure , details look good , be interesting to see a painted version as well

    Wonder what causes the clothing to push out at the back

    Wide variety of weapons on the sculpt as well

    Thanks for sharing

    Happy sculpting

    Stay safe

    Nap
    Oda and Vladimir Sychev like this.
  8. Vladimir Sychev Well-Known Member

    Country:
    Russian-Federation
    Thank you for your kind words, colleagues.

    The customer and future manufacturer of the miniature is the same as before.

    The clothing of the peoples of the Caucasus is their pride, which is why it is very conservative.

    The skirt of the Circassian is raised from behind by the barrels of pistols tucked into the belt. This method of carrying a weapon is shown in the above prototype engraving.

    FB_IMG_1585324132577.jpg
    Oda and Nap like this.
  9. Nap A Fixture

    Country:
    England

    Thank you for the information

    Nap
  10. NeilW A Fixture

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    Perhaps he's just pleased to see you?
    Tonton, fogie, Oda and 1 other person like this.
  11. akaryu PlanetFigure Supporter

    Country:
    Belgium
    Excellent figure!

    Where can I buy one?

    cheers,

    Pierre
    Oda and Nap like this.
  12. Martin Rohmann A Fixture

    Country:
    Germany
    Some pics of original clothes and details from my fundus in color...:

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]

    [IMG]


    Cheers
    Nap, captnenglish and akaryu like this.
  13. NeilW A Fixture

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    Useful, thanks Martin (y)

    Just a little unclear about the leg-wear. It appears to be some form of trouser (full or calf length?) covered by footless 'hose' to just above the knee with a further tube of material covering the knee with a garter holding it on.

    Is that correct?
  14. Martin Rohmann A Fixture

    Country:
    Germany
    These are a kind of leggings that were worn over the pants (and to protect the pants and legs).

    Similar overcoats - only longer - wore Prussian hussars over their breeches during the Seven Years' War.

    There they were called "Charivari" ...

    [IMG]


    Cheers
    Nap and captnenglish like this.
  15. NeilW A Fixture

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    Hi Martin,

    Yes, got the hussar legging thing tho' I've never come across them called 'charivari ( this gives quite a different meaning) and, for Austria at least, MaA 271 calls them 'scharawaden' :unsure:

    It was the extra bit with the garter over the knees that I wasn't so sure about, so thanks for the clarification (y)

    Neil
  16. Richard Baxter A Fixture

    Country:
    Scotland
    Hi Neil,

    It looks to me as though "chiarivari" and "scharawarden" are derivations of the same word in Italian and German. Their pronunciation would be kind of similar, I think.
    NeilW and captnenglish like this.
  17. captnenglish Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    My thought as well
  18. NeilW A Fixture

    Country:
    United-Kingdom
    Strange that it is also from French meaning:

    charivari m (plural charivaris)
    1. (historical) charivari, shivaree (mock serenade of discordant noise, notably to heckle a publicly reviled figure)
    2. (by extension) racket, banging in general, rumpus
    From Old French chalivali (noise from pots and pans), from Late Latin caribaria, from carivaria, from Ancient Greek καρηβάρεια (karēbáreia, headache), from κάρη (kárē, head) and βαρύς (barús, heavy).
    A nice use of it here for what I assume is a jangly/noisy piece of jewellery
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Alpenflüstern-HCH00800095N-Traditional-Costume-Charivari/dp/B077K383JT
  19. akaryu PlanetFigure Supporter

    Country:
    Belgium
    Dear fellow figurinists and as it appears etymologists!

    Allow me to add my two kopeks to this passionating thread about a masterpiece of a figure and its costume.

    The French 'charivari', meaning the side-buttoned overtrousers to protect the fine riding trousers from the rigors of campaigning and the smell of the horse too I presume, has crept into that language through contact with the Austro-hungarian troops in old Nap's time. No, not our moderator, the other less well known one.
    The word occurs in some Slavic languages, all meaning loose-fitting or "Turkish" trousers:
    Polish: szarawary
    Russian: sharovary ШАРОВА́РЫ
    Czech: saravara
    Bulgarian: salwari
    Serbo-Croatian: salware

    All find their origin in the Indian language: saravar = trousers , cfr the national dress 'salwar kameez' in present-day India and Pakistan, 'salwar' meaning ankle length loose fitting trousers.

    Now back to the bench and I hope to lay my hands or still better my brushes on this beauty soon!

    Cheers,

    Pierre
    Jaybo and Nap like this.
  20. Richard Baxter A Fixture

    Country:
    Scotland
    Excellent research. Thanks Neil, merci Pierre.

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