1. Copying kits is a crime that hurts original artists & producers. Help support your favorite artists by buying their original works. PlanetFigure will not tolerate any activities related to recasting, and will report recasters to authorities. Thank you for your support!

And now for something completely different...

Discussion in 'vBench (Works in Progress)' started by Lovejoy, Apr 15, 2008.

  1. Lovejoy New Member

    Country:
    England
    I'm supposed to be working on my 90mm samurai, but I've put it off slightly, to do a project I've had in mind for years but never done.
    It's a bust, 1/20th (90mm) scale rather than 1/10th, because there's two heads, not just one...
    Here's the basic shape.

    Attached Files:

  2. Uruk-Hai PlanetFigure Supporter

    Country:
    Sweden
    I think I see where you are going with this Michael!
    And I thinks its very innovative.

    I will keep an eye on this thread.

    Cheers
  3. Lovejoy New Member

    Country:
    England
    Here's one of the heads roughed in:

    Attached Files:

  4. Sambaman Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Great idea, actually, I'd like to see this in 200mm! Keep us posted.

    Jay H.
    OKC
  5. Lovejoy New Member

    Country:
    England
    Okay, here he is with a caparison and demi-chanfron.
    And Jay, if it works okay in 90mm, I might just try a 200mm version - always open to new ideas!

    Attached Files:

  6. Steve Well-Known Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Great imagination, Michael. I look forward to the finished piece.
  7. Bad91Fellow Member

    Country:
    Germany
    i always wondered why nobody did a bust like this. and here it is! great!
  8. Mongo Mel Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Nice idea!
    I'm looking forward to seeing more.
    Craig
  9. Lovejoy New Member

    Country:
    England
    Thanks for the comments everyone!
    Okay, more on the horse - the bulk of it's done, but it needs a LOT of tidying.

    Attached Files:

  10. John Bowery A Fixture

    Country:
    United-States
    Michael,
    Great idea and looking good so far.
    Cheers
    John
  11. davidmitchell A Fixture

    Country:
    Scotland
    Great idea dont think its been done before!!
    David
  12. renarts Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    This is exciting. It looks like you are off to a great start. I do question the placement of the saddle though. You have the arson (the steel plate covering the swell or bow of the saddle that protects the rider on the front of the saddle) forward of or over the withers. Saddles sit just behind the withers and are built to snug up against them to cover the areas of the back and loin and not to impede the horses movement or cause discomfort or serious movement of the rider over these joint and muscle attachment areas. (withers and croup).

    Be sure to add a strap for the crinet as well. As you have them now there is nothing to stop them from flapping or bouncing around on the horses neck.

    Your horses neck looks too short and the head doesn't seem to be angled properly in relation to the pull on the rein.

    Be careful on how tightly you have the throat latch strap. It should be loose and not snugged up that tight.

    I look forward to your progress.
  13. vergilius New Member

    Country:
    Belgium
  14. Zlobov*S Active Member

    Greetings Michael! It is a unexpected variant a bust - very interesting combination a part of a horse and a part the horseman!
    We wait for continuation!
    Yours faithfully.
  15. frank h Well-Known Member

    Country:
    England
    A great idea
    coming together nicely ......look forward to seeing more pics of your progress

    Frank
  16. Lovejoy New Member

    Country:
    England
    I had hoped to get on with the rider today, but as Mike (Renarts) rightly points out, the whole thing was just way too short! So I've gone back to the horse again, and lengthened the neck, cut off the rider, and just generally moved things around.
    I've also cut off the reins. Mike, you said the angle of reins to head was wrong - any chance you can explain how I should position them? Or would I be better off leaving the reins out altogether, and supplying lead foil with the kit? I'd prefer to sculpt them on if possible, but if the pose makes this difficult, I could go with foil.

    Any opinions, anyone?

    Anyway, here's the latest pics:

    Attached Files:

  17. petit belge New Member

    Country:
    Belgium
  18. petit belge New Member

    Country:
    Belgium
  19. renarts Active Member

    Country:
    United-States
    Michael,
    The way you had the reins on before showed an extreme shortening on one side and slack on the other. Given how you had the bit rings pulled back on the horses mouth and the shortening of the rein on one side this would imply that the rider was pulling back on the left rein and the horses head would be pulled a little more extremely than what you had. When riding, you grip the reins in the center. Your previous sculpt was doing the opposite. My advice would be to put some slight slack in the reins and leave them relatively equal to imply that the horse "has his head" and is turning it naturaly. Or slightly have them pulled over to the left. Trained horses don't need much to make them turn. Most of it is done via leg placement and pressure. I move my horses around using only leg and use reins to pull them up for the proper lead for cantor or gallop and or to make extreme turns.

    The photo reference regarding the bridle from the SCA site is good but not correct in that the woman has the throat latch too tight on her horse in the reconstruction. The throat latch is not really all that necessary and is there really only to keep the horse (or rider) from pulling the bridle over its head by rubbing or having it pulled on when the head is down. Since it goes over the windpipe and if pulled up too tight it can restrict the breathing of the horse, especially if the horse is galloping or in this case charging. ( as a side note, even today in eastern europe and parts of the middle east they still "slit the nostrils" of horses, donkeys and mules in the belief that they will get more air and breath better under periods of stress) so it stands to restrict the windpipe in any way is not desirable. While I understand the reference that Roger was providing, it is flawed as too many things are that involve the SCA and its quasi form of history rec-reating and not re-creating. Though the period references he included are great for reference, they are also flawed in that they are artistic representations and not necessarily true to life. Though there are a few that depict the proper adjustment of a loose throat latch.

    If you are going to do more horse equipment and are looking for reference, I highly reccomend the Museum of Londons archeological survey of The Medieval Horse and its Equipment. Where the reconstruction of the bridle on the website provided by Roger is what it is, the hardware or "furniture" (rivets, buckles etc.) are modern and not medieval. There is a difference. In some cases albiet small, but in others rather alot.

    I like what you did on the fix and it looks much better and more in proportion. The saddle seems in the proper place now as well. I hope I was clear enough about the reins. If not let me know and I'll see if I can explain it better.

    Regards,
    Mike
  20. Lovejoy New Member

    Country:
    England
    Thanks again everyone for the comments and advice - it really is appreciated!

    I've not done a huge amount over the weekend, because I was getting on with my Samurai figure instead. But I did tidy up the horse, and add a few details. I'll probably leave the horse as it is, and look at it again once I've done the rider.

    Attached Files:

Share This Page

planetFigure Links

Reviews & Open Box
Buy. Sell & trade
Articles
Link Directory
Events
Advertising

Popular Sections

Figure & Minis News
vBench - Works in Progress
Painting Talk
Sculpting Talk
Digital Sculpting Talk
The Lounge
Report Piracy

Who we are

planetFigure is a community built around miniature painters, sculptors and collectors, We are here to exchange support, Information & Resources.

© planetFigure 2003 - 2019.